Captivated

This morning Bud and I went to the children’s museum. We try and go once a week because it’s awesome and Bud loves it there. I love that each time we go Bud finds something new that sparks his attention. This morning, it was a turtle.

Yep. That sweet boy stood in front of the tiny aquarium in the corner and stared at the turtle forever. He kept pointing and yelling, “TUTTLE!” and then would get really quiet and just soak in every movement that turtle was doing. He was captivated.

At first I found myself wanting to move on to the next thing. I fought myself wanting to say “Lets look over here Bud!” or “I bet you’ll love this Bud!” but I resisted. I let my boy be captivated by something so simple for as long as he wanted. I plopped down on the floor next to him and just enjoyed the peace.

We live in such a hurried world and I so desperately don’t want to pass that down to my son. I even wrote a paper in grad school about some of the environmental causes of ADHD in children and one of the ones I kept coming back to was the parent’s tendency to move the children along to the next activity or the next toy or the next stimulus.

I’m re-reading 1000 Gifts by Ann Voskamp and leading a little discussion group at my house on Fridays. She references an Evelyn Underhill quote which I love, “On every level of life, from housework to heights of prayer, in all judgment and efforts to get things done, hurry and impatience are sure marks of the amateur.”

So, at least for this morning, I sat down next to my son who teaches me so much about life and I didn’t play the part of the rushed amateur. I was captivated right along side of him.

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  • sgam83 sgam83

    Love this! Just the other weekend I plopped myself next to the sandbox fighting the urge to move my daughter to the next thing at the museum as she scooped and poored sand for 30 minutes. I love just watching her explore, interact, and look at me with a smile when a little kid does something silly. Those children run fast but they sure do teach a good lesson on slowing down.